IdleNoMore Wisconsin

#IdleNoMore Wisconsin Sovereign Nations! for Mashkiziibii (Medicine Water) PROTECT & SERVE MOTHER EARTH - CLEAN LAND+AIR+WATER = LIFE ... STOP THE MINES ...
Mission
MISSION The, "Idle No More calls on all people to join in a revolution which honors and fulfills Indigenous sovereignty which protects the land and water." The movement wants to "stop the government from passing more laws and legislation that will further erode treaty and indigenous rights and the rights of all Indigenous people globally." - We are in Solidarity with Canada, Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin to Idle No More, Protect our Lands and Water.

~ Disclaimer ~
WE ARE NOT AN ORGANIZATION ... WE ARE GRASSROOTS TRIBAL INDIVIDUALS WORKING TOGETHER TO INITIATE #IDLENOMORE WISCONSIN IN SOLIDARITY WITH CANADA, INDIGENOUS PEOPLE AND COMMUNITIES.


#IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN - A Peaceful Movement of Integrity and Honor with a concrete focus to protect our lands, water and the trust and agreement inclusions of sovereignty rights for a quality of life for our future generations. - "It's been said that "The only thing we learn from history is that we learn nothing from history" and the current mining bills before the Wisconsin state legislature would perpetuate a long, tragic, and shameful history of U.S. treaty violations with Indigenous Peoples. -- The 7th Generation has begun."

#IDLE NO MORE WISCONSIN - Grateful for the support and dedication of the Overpass Light Brigade illuminating #IdleNoMore with beautiful messages bringing the community together as ONE FIRE.

Sisters and Brothers leading Idle No More Wisconsin is:
* Rachel Byington, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
* Arvina Marin, Ho Chunk Nation Diana Miller, Menominee Nation
* Sarah LittlerRedfeather, decent of the Anishinaabe, MN Chippewa Band - White Earth
* Sanford LittleEagle, Ho Chunk Nation
* Chuck Davis, Sr.
* We are in FULL Solidarity and active with IdleNoMore Milwaukee.

* One Tribe One Nation One Fire Honoring Chief Theresa Spence, and the women who started the IdleNoMore Movement.

* VAWA Indigenous Women Issues Our congress refuses to sign the VAWA Law that has the protections and rights to prosecute non-natives who abuse our Women on Tribal Lands and more, this is important. Global awareness, to Stop the Violence Against Women, Sexual Assault, lack of support for justice departments from leaders of disappearing indigenous women, and children murdered and / or sold into human trafficking.

* NO MINE IN THE PENOKEE HILLS Bad River is under attack under Mining Special Interests in Legislature, the Treaties that Protects and Preserves our Cultural Environment, Lands and the Water, honor them.

* Stop the ma'iingan (Wolf) Hunt - Wolf Hunt Desecrates Anishinaabe Creation

* Colonialism changing to Cultural Awareness and Pride - Educate and collaborate to end stereotyping, and racism in our communities; creating a support system to create confidence and positive living in our communities.
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Despite the fact that most Americans object to the tactic of shutting down the government over Obamacare, Congressional Republicans continue to insist that they will not pass a budget for the federal government unless theAffordable Care Act is defunded, meaning that the government could potentially shut down when its current funding authorization runs out this coming Monday, September 30th.

A review of the most recent contingency plans completed in December 2011 for federal agencies shows that under a government shutdown, federal land management agencies would be required to close national parks, wildlife refuges, and national forests to the general public but keep them open to most oil, gas, and mining operations.

The National Park Service’s contingency plan says:

Effective immediately upon a lapse in appropriations, the National Park Service will take all necessary steps to close and secure national park facilities and grounds in order to suspend all activities except for those that are essential to respond to emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property…Where ever possible, park roads will be closed and access will be denied.

The closures, which may happen just 48 hours after tens of thousands of volunteers turn out this Saturday for National Public Lands Day, will not only throw a wrench in countless family plans, but will send chills through the country’s multibillion dollar tourism and recreation industry.

But because Congress allocates resources to federal agencies through a complex mix of funding sources, public lands and waters would likely remain open to most oil, gas, and mining operations.

This is even true for national parks. Drilling is currently happening in 12 national parks, including in Padre Island National Seashore in Texas and Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida. The National Park Service’s contingency plan did not specify what impacts the shutdown would have on oil and gas operations within these areas but it does note that “access to personal and commercial inholdings and leased facilities is permitted.”

Additionally, while the Bureau of Land Management will not be able toprocess new oil and gas permits, oil and gas production at existing operations is expected to continue in other locations onshore according to the Bureau of Land Management’s contingency plan. Yet only minimal agency personnel necessary for “protection of human life and property” will be on duty for inspections and enforcement and to oversee drilling activities such as “well shut-ins, re-completions, and downhole/equipment changes in drilling/plugging operations.” Current mining operations on public lands may continue as well, provided they do not need new authorizations or permits.

Offshore oil and gas drilling will also be largely unaffected by a shutdown. The contingency plan for the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, one of the two agencies that manages oil and gas offshore, states that:

In the event of a shutdown, BOEM would continue to perform major operations and planning. This would allow the Bureau to continue to plan for future exploration and development of energy resources on the Outer Continental Shelf… The operations and planning activities that continue would allow industry to function during a government shutdown.

Being “denied access” to national parks and public lands is not the only way that Americans will feel the effects of a government shutdown when it comes to energy and the environment. As Climate Progress describedthis week, other federal agencies would be required to stop environmental permitting for construction projects, cleanup of toxic waste sites, as well as many scientific research projects. Additionally, the Smithsonian Institution wrote in 2011 that “it would be necessary for us to close all museum buildings to the public.”

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